Wednesday, January 27, 2010

To ink... or not to ink...


As I mentioned some days ago, I've got two fresh new sets of Zocchi's precision-cut Gamescience dice itching to get some roll-time in at my table.

My dilemma is this: To ink, or not to ink?

There is something raw and pure about them* in their present, un-inked state that tugs gently on my nostalgia strings. But they're a bit hard to read, too. Of course, there's always the crayon option...

What do you guys think? (Yes, I'll be counting votes)



*How big of a gaming geek do I have to be to describe dice as "raw and pure"!?;)

30 comments:

  1. Dice are useless if not played with, and inking increases ease of use in play. Ink 'em!

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  2. Ink 'em, so much easier to use, and using them is why you have them; but use a crayon, because that's true vintage nerd-dom...

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  3. You will only find true enjoyment from them through use. Personally, I would pretend like its the old days again and use a crayon.

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  4. You've got two sets - ink one and keep the other raw and pure.

    They are very nice in their virgin state - I got Mummy Grognard a set of Chessex Ice Blue for Christmas because she likes sparkly things.

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  5. Ink 'em! They scream for the ink!

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  6. Ink! Ink! Ink! Ink! Ink! Ink! Ink! Ink!

    And then tell us how you like them!

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  7. Over the holidays my wife got a crystal clear GS set like you posted a picture of. They were barely usable without coloring the numbers. She used black crayon on them and now they're great.

    One cool thing about black crayon is that you can make out the little GS logo on some of the dice. I never even noticed the logo before.

    I can't think of any reason you shouldn't ink or crayon the numbers...

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  8. Ink 'em. One of my players refuses to ink his dice and has to squint at them for like fifteen seconds every time he rolls.

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  9. Ink them, my friend. Without readable numbers they're not dice, just shiny lumps of plastic.

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  10. hmmm . . . They are beautiful.

    Unfortunately -- ink them.

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  11. I say leave them pure. You already have readable dice: you don't have dice that look like diamonds.

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  12. Definitely ink. I've got some opaque ones, and they're hard enough to read uninked, so I can only imagine how these are.

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  13. Keep them pure. I got a set of clear precision dice and inked them with a black Sharpie...now they look cheap and difficult to read because all the numbers show through every surface.

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  14. Those are so pretty! But it would drive me nuts if I tried to play w/those the way they are.

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  15. Dice are for gaming with. I'd use a crayon.

    OTOH, I would have bought plain dice and not those transparent things which are so hard to read.

    Crayon.

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  16. I just inked my ice blue set (that I've had for over a year) this past weekend - and they're exquisite. I plan to use them regulalrly now.

    One tip: don't use black ink if you do ink them - use a complementary color. I used blue Sharpie on my ice blue set - and they look great! :D

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  17. I vote ink one set now, save one for later. Now and Later - that's Old School! ;)

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  18. Don't use a crayon...I did and it made all of the dice in my bag look filthy over the years.

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  19. same thing Blair said! but make sure to ink them well!

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  20. Break those babies in.. INK EM!!

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  21. What? filthy? Don't you lovingly clean your dice once in a while and recrayon those that need it? Me and my daughter do this together. Very calming.

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  22. After playing for more than a decade with a Zocchi gem die set I couldn't read to save my life, I invested a stupid amount of time working on a method to get them inked and pretty. I found the following method worked fantastically:

    1. use a wash method of miniature paint that's been watered down. Dab onto the surface of each number - because it's been watered down, it'll really get into nooks and cracks. Do twice to insure that the ink gets set.

    2. Let dry and rub each surface with rubbing alcohol to get rid of stray marks.

    3. Spray OUTDOORS with a clear plastic sealant and let dry outside for a long period of time.

    4. Humidity will effect the way it drys. Best to do when dry.

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